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AMINO ACIDS: WHO ARE THEY, WHAT DO THEY DO AND WHAT IS THEIR ROLE IN TRAINING?


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Want to get the most out of your workout with a healthy and balanced diet? In this case, the amino acids will be your new companions of life. During muscle development, in particular, it is advisable to take advantage of the amino acid characteristics to support your muscles. We show you what they are used for and how to integrate them into your training. For a sustainable and efficient training!

WHAT ARE AMINO ACIDS?

To put it simply: our body can not do without. They are the building blocks of proteins that are vital to our body. They also serve as hormones, enzyme precursors and neurotransmitters. We need it for many of the metabolic processes that occur every day in our body. 20 different proteinogenic amino acids from the most important base, from which the body produces more than 50,000 distinct. Of these 20 proteinogenic amino acids, eight are said to be essential.

NOT ESSENTIAL … ESSENTIAL … WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE?

To put it simply: Essential amino acids are those that the body can not synthesize itself. You must bring them to your body through your diet. The non-essential amino acids, them, the body takes care of it alone.

ESSENTIAL AMINO ACIDS: WHAT ARE THEY SERVING AND WHERE ARE THEY FIND?

There are 8 essential amino acids in all. In order to feel as good in your body as in your head, it is important to have a sufficient intake of these amino acids.

AMINO ACIDS: WHAT EFFECTS AND IN WHICH FOOD?

Isoleucine:

Is responsible for the maintenance and regeneration of muscle tissue. Also an important source of energy during strength training or cardio.Present in: chicken breast, peas, salmon, egg, walnuts, whole wheat flour

Leucine:

Plays an important role in the structure and maintenance of protein in the muscles. Also provides energy in the muscles and supports different repair processes. Present in: peas, chicken breast, salmon, egg, walnuts, whole wheat flour.

Lysine:

Helps maintain muscle and connective tissues. It is used with methionine in the synthesis of carnitine, which plays a key role in lipid metabolism.
Present in: squash seeds, chicken breast, salmon, peas, tofu, chicken egg, buckwheat flour, walnuts.

Methionine:

A precursor of cysteine, protein-forming amino acid, and directly involved in the formation of proteins. It is used with lysine in the synthesis of carnitine, which largely participates in lipid metabolism.

Phenylalanine:

Important for the construction of proteins and a large number of primordial hormones such as epinephrine, norepinephrine or dopamine, a hormone of happiness.Present in: soy, squash seeds, peas, poultry, walnuts, pork, salmon, egg.

Threonine:

Participates in the biosynthesis of vitamin B12 and isoleucine. Present in: chicken breast, beef, peas, salmon, walnuts, chicken egg, whole wheat flour.

Tryptophan:

May have anti-depressant effects because it is the precursor of each molecule of serotonin. When you do not bring enough tryptophan to the body, it can not build serotonin. As a wellness hormone, it allows us to feel good and to be in a good mood.